Saturday, April 27, 2013

ITS NOT PRETTY, BUT...

While this sure looks like cobwebs, it is unlikely that Manitoba has a spider so hardy she burrows under the snow spinning her webs at -35.
 It is mold. Snow mold. It is not a big danger but the sooner the ground is dry enough to be raked, the better to get some air in there and get the dead stuff out.

The streets feel particularly empty without the massive piles of snow along the curbs and 3 feet of snow spreading across the lawns as far as the eye can see. There is noticeably more space here now. I do not expect seasoned Winnipeggers to notice it in the same way but for a recently transplanted Torontonian, it makes a difference.
Underneath the back spruce we have a winter's worth of accumulated bird feed detritus. Aside from the bird seed a tree this size loses lots of needles and even some small branches over the course of the winter and you can tally them all come spring; 6 months of natural decay laid out before you on a white blanket is not anything we got to see in Toronto. 
A unique measure of the passing of time.





With a few flying insects making their appearance and plenty of geese overhead & ducks in the river, and the thermometer not even dipping below zero last night for the first time, I declare that spring has officially arrived in Winnipeg. 

How do you officially recognize spring where you are?

4 comments:

  1. When the spring vetch and cleaver plant weeds are in a race to cover up all the gardens is when spring is official for me, LOL. Now I'm in a race to get them all pulled out or poisoned so the native wildflowers have a chance. We all probably have a downside to gardening, and this is mine. I love your yard; so much space. That's what I miss with mine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah weeds, a definite sign of spring! I Love my big new yard too. Now I just have to plant it, LOL.

      Delete
  2. I can't imagine snow that stays so long it gets moldy! Spring comes very early here, as we have short, half-hearted winters. By February forsythias, quince, and daffodils are blooming. By April spring is in its fullest glory. We wait for brutal summer heat to arrive, hoping it's June and not May!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, so different. We definitely have a solid winter here, this one in particular has been long, and daffodils won't be blooming until May.

      Delete